Penang Street Art (Toh Aka Lane Sculpture)

A steel rod art sculpture depicting an Ironsmith at work, which also tells the origin of the Toh Aka Lane (Lorong Toh Aka) in George Town. Known locally in the old days as “Ironworks Street”, most of the people staying in this area were ironsmiths and the majority of them belonged to the Cheah clan.

Penang Street Art (Lumut Lane Sculpture)

Lumut Lane Sculpture

An art sculpture made of steel rods found at the back of an old shophouse’s wall at Lumut Lane, George Town. The sculpture’s caricature reveals that Lumut Lane is also the birthplace of novelist Ahmad Rashid Talu (born in 1889), who wrote the first Malay novel incorporating local settings and characters.

Penang Street Art (Cintra Street)

Cintra Street Street Sculpture

A steel rod art sculpture spotted at the wall of a coffeeshop which is located at the cross junction of Cintra Street and Kimberley Street in George Town. According to the brief description of the art sculpture, Cintra Street is popular for its row of dim sum restaurants.

Penang Isle: Sungai Pinang Bridge

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Sg Pinang

Sungai Pinang (or simply translated as Pinang River) is a large river that flows from the western side of Penang island. The red Sungai Pinang steel bridge was completed in 2008 to replace the old one and easily stands out as a small landmark in the area. The Sungai Pinang fishing boat wharf is also located nearby the bridge.

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Fishing boat wharf at Sungai Pinang.

George Town Street View: An Old Facade

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Penang Street Art (Lorong Muda Sculpture)

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Lorong Muda is a small lane off Stewart Lane and the area is popular for traditional joss sticks maker as depicted in this steel rod wall sculpture.

Penang Street Art (Sungai Ujong Road)

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This steel sculpture found at Sungai Ujong Road depicts barbers who once set up their business along the Prangin Canal back in the old days of Penang. Hairs which were cut were apparently thrown by the barber shops into the canal during that time. Sungai Ujong Road also marks the end point of the former Prangin River. Sungai Ujong Road serves as the connection between Prangin Road and Kimberley Street.